Research Library

Lean Methods Group's Research Library features diverse content designed to stimulate your thinking. We’ve gathered what we feel are relevant articles and videos from business publications, journals and researchers so you can explore what others are saying about operational strategy and business management.

by Tim Brown on June 01, 2008

Tim Brown of IDEO discusses innovation driven by Design Thinking and different processes that go along with it. The basic idea is to listen and think like your future consumers, then develop an innovation accordingly. Using other products as examples this article reveals successful processes aiding innovation through Design Thinking.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Customers, Design/Development, Innovation
by Stephen Wunker and George Pohle on November 12, 2007

Stephen Wunker and George Pohle talk about the innovation process and the four different archetypes a company can fall under. Each archetype involves a successful innovation environment including CEO involvement, staff support and different innovation processes. In all four archetypes there are big name companies that have defined themselves as successful innovators.

Source: Forbes Magazine
Tags: Employee Relations, Innovation
by John Seely Brown and John Hagel III on May 16, 2006

John Seely Brown and John Hagel Ill give details on the concept of creation nets and open innovation. Innovation is commonly accepted in the current business world as a growth strategy, but many companies are weary about introducing open innovation due to the amount of uncertainty involved. This article discusses creation nets as a strategy to bring structure into open innovation allowing businesses to introduce this innovation strategy into their company with confidence.

Source: The McKinsey Quarterly
Tags: Employee Relations, Innovation, Leadership
by Peter D. Haden, Olivier Sibony, and Kevin D. Sneader on December 01, 2004

In this article Peter D. Haden, Olivier Sibony and Kevin D. Sneader describe the consumer goods business and strategies used in order to be successful when dealing with low returns on efficiency efforts and increased competition. Some of these strategies global companies utilize include outsourcing production and consolidating. When global companies have had to consolidate it allows the regional companies to crop up taking care of the products global businesses end up neglecting making it possible for both types of companies co-exist.

Source: The McKinsey Quarterly
Tags: Business Development, Growth, Strategy
by UNCTAD on April 20, 2008

The UNCTAD assesses the creative economy so the United Nations is more coherent toward the creative economy by discussing the overall structure, sharing analyses showing international trade changes and suggesting possible strategic policy changes.

Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
Tags: Economic Development, Employee Relations, Strategy
by Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad on July 01, 1994

Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad tell about the importance of looking into the future when it comes to companies. Many companies in the business world today are only looking at the short term attempting to stay a successful company. What a company really needs to do is to develop some foresight and obtain the ability to control the future of the company and redefine the industry.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Strategy, Sustainability
by Larry Huston and Nabil Sakkab on March 01, 2006

Larry Huston and Navil Saddab explain the method behind connect and develop. The general idea behind it is to use an external R&D sources to find solutions to your innovation problems. Instead of solely relying on your internal R&D department, external sources can be used providing a reduction in cost while increasing productivity.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Design/Development, Employee Relations, Innovation
by Donald L. Laurie, Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer on May 01, 2006

Donald L. Laurie, Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer talk about what a company needs to do in order to increase their growth rate after it begins to fall short of expectations. The main idea this article presents involves creating a new platforms for businesses instead of developing new products. In some cases the development of products can increase growth rates, but creating new platforms is more effective in the long term.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Growth, Strategy
by Alex Taylor III on July 12, 2010

In this article, Alex Taylor III reports on Toyota and the large number of recalls experienced between 2005 - 2009, their cause and the effects they have had on Toyota as a whole. Toyota has long been known to be a very successful company, but due to a complicated system it lacks the ability to quickly respond to consumer complaints in the United States. This became apparent when Katsuaki Watanabe, a newly appointed president, asked the company to cut prices in order to increase profitability. 

Source: FORTUNE Global 500
Tags: Customers, Employee Relations, Strategy
by Joseph L. Bower and Clayton M. Christensen on January 01, 1995

Joseph L. Bower and Clayton M. Christensen explain how Disruptive Technologies work and the repercussions they have on industry leaders. Disruptive Technologies are dangerous because initially underestimated they end up coopting a large majority of that industry's clients when further developed. This article explains what makes a Disruptive Technology so dangerous and what current industry leaders can do to compete and keep their consumer base.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Change, Innovation
by Tarun Khanna and Krishna G. Palepu on October 01, 2006

Tarun Khanna and Krishna G. Palepu describe competition between global and local corporations. At first glance the global cooperation may appear to have the competitors edge when competing in an emerging market, but this may not necessarily be the case. This article talks about different ways a small local group is able to compete, and my even have the upper hand when competing against the global cooperation in emerging markets.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Customers, Growth
by Nitin Nohria, Boris Groysberg, and Linda-Eling Lee on July 01, 2008

Nitin Nohria, Boris Groysberg, and Linda-Eling Lee inform us about four factors directly linked to employee motivation. Many companies are not being as productive as possible due to a lack of employee motivation. This article gives examples of techniques companies can implement that develop four specific factors increasing employee motivation and productivity.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Change, Employee Relations, Leadership
by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton on January 01, 2006

Jeffrey Pfreffer and Robert I. Sutton explain evidenced based management and why businesses adopting this methodology are more successful. Many companies work based on the notion that successfully implemented strategies in a business will help their business be more successful. This article talks about evidence based management and the idea of running a business based on research proven facts instead of inclinations and common practices.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Leadership, Strategy
by Nitin Nohria on July 01, 2005

Nitin Nohria writes a case study concerning decisions executives must make keeping R&D in house or outsourcing. In this article RLK, a high end sound and video company, has developed a prototype allowing people to enjoy a home entertainment experience in a head set. The executive (Lars) must develop this new technology to save his company, and the R&D department needs to expand in order to develop.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Design/Development, Employee Relations, Innovation
by Thomas A. Stewart and Anand P. Raman on July 01, 2008

Thomas A. Stewart and Anand P. Raman interview Anand Mahindrathe CEO of Mahinda & Mahinda about his cooperation's operations. In this article Anand Mahindathe explains the difference between a federation and a conglomerate, and innovation's part when it comes to globalization. Because his cooperation is a federation of businesses he is able to look over all of them without interfering. Anand explains the reasons and advantages to running a cooperation in this fashion.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Economic Development, Innovation, Leadership
by Richard Galant on July 14, 2010

Richard Galant covers the TED 2010 conference. He discusses the process of idea creation with topics including the rise of coffee, "ideas having sex with each other" and comparisons between Chinese growth and U.S. decline. He believes the development of an idea is interesting and complex, but these talks help bring light to the process.

Source: CNN
Tags: Innovation, Methodology
by Chris Zook on April 01, 2007

In this article Chris Zook looks at companies atempting to develop a new core business. A large part of this article includes specific properties and questions companies need to consider before determining whether or not a core adjustment is applicable. There are many examples of businesses that have gone about this process incorrectly resulting in a major downturn. But, if the principles discussed in this article were applied, finding your next core business would overall be a more successful endeavor.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Leadership, Strategy
by Hirotaka Takeuchi, Emi Osono, and Norihiko Shimizu on June 10, 2008

In this article Hirotaka Takeuchi, Emi Osono, and Norihiko Shimizu discuss the way Toyota runs their company. Many organizations know Toyota as a company that excels in efficiency and innovativeness, but their path to innovativeness is unique. Using many different procedures, Toyota creates and stabilizes a culture of innovation. If change comes they have the ability to adapt and anybody has the authority to challenge the processes because information flows throughout the company.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Employee Relations, Innovation, Methodology
by Francis Bidault and Alessio Castello on May 10, 2010

In this article Francis Bidault and Alessio Castello discuss the concept of trust’s relationship with innovation when companies cooperate. In Francis and Alessio’s study a bell curve became apparent when trust was compared with innovativeness. A lack of trust results in a lack of innovation, but too much trust also leads to a lack of innovation. The key is to have just the right amount of trust. The ideal amount of trust comes when each side believes the other is going to do its part, but also challenges the other’s ideas.

Source: MIT Sloan Management Review
Tags: Change, Employee Relations, Innovation
by Gary Hamel on February 01, 2006

In this article, Gary Hamel writes about management innovation and how essential it is for a company to practice. Most companies have innovation initiatives dealing with new products and process improvements, but management innovation isn’t even on their radar. Gaining understanding of the importance of constant management innovation and the ability to continuously apply it to the work place creates distance between competitors while moving companies in a forward direction.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Innovation, Leadership
by David M. Upton and Bradley R. Staats on March 01, 2008

In this article, David M. Upton and Bradley R. Staats talk about the process of IT implementing enterprise systems. It is discussed that when a business implements a new enterprise system it should be a modular model. Using this technique allows enterprise systems to adapt to problems that arise. Trying to account for everything before the system is programmed and implemented causes it to be rigid and costly.   

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags:
by James P. Hackett on April 01, 2007

In this article James P. Hackett talks about his company Steelcase and the process they use when designing and implementing new products. Steelcase uses a four step implementation process designed to make them slow down and consider all the aspects of the project before executing. This also allows Steelcase to learn from their mistakes and gives them the ability to scrap a project if the information is leading them down an undesired path.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Design/Development, Employee Relations, Strategy
by Paul A. Gompers, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner and David S. Scharfstein on July 01, 2008

In this article Paul A. Gompers, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner and David S. Scharfstein talk about the existence of performance persistence when it comes to different aspects of entrepreneurship. Observing the roots of performance persistence allows the success rate of different entrepreneurs to be approximated. Some variables observed were previous venture success, serial entrepreneurship, and level and timing of venture capital funding.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Customers
by Darrell K. Rigby and Chris Zook on October 01, 2002

In this article Darrell Rigby and Chris Zook discuss open-market innovation and how a business can utilize this concept to get ahead. Innovation is a high priority with many businesses utilizing open-market innovation to increases profits, decreases development time and allow internal resources to concentrate on what they do best. Even though some companies might be nervous about sharing innovations this article shows, utilizing examples, that a correctly structured deal allows open-source innovation to positively influence all parties involved.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Change, Innovation
by Joseph L. Bower on March 01, 2001

In this article Joseph L. Bower talks about acquisitions and mergers, why a business would begin this process and the ups and down for each version. Overall there are five different reasons a business would go through an acquisition or merger. In each type the business must take certain initiatives in order to be successful. After a description of each version Joseph gives recommendations that guide businesses to success.

Source: Harvard Business Review
Tags: Business Development, Economic Development, Strategy

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